2017 - Hawkdive

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Mac boot process stucks on Grey Screen with apple logo after upgrading to macOS Sierra - [ Fixed ]

Sunday, September 24, 2017 0
Have you ever experienced or heard about Mac which gets stuck on grey screen with Apple logo and a progress bar during boot process or has it ever happened with you that your Mac doesn't boot and stalls on the grey screen at startup just after you upgraded to macOS Sierra or El Capitan. If you are experiencing any of these problems and looking for a solution then trust me this will be the best organized article for you to fix Mac grey screen issue and recover from no boot situation while saving your precious data.
Mac boot process stucks on grey screen with Apple logo
Mac boot process stucks on grey screen with Apple logo and a progress bar
Though, It's a rare problem but I am sure most of the Mac users might have experienced it at least once. There is no doubt that Apple provides its customers with the best piece of hardware for a beautiful user experience but still as we know, nobody is perfect in this world and Mac is just a machine and so can malfunction at times. Problems can be of different types but the problem at startup is most frustrating that makes you lame and cripples you the most especially when you have some important data in your computer. This article focuses on solving Mac grey screen problems or no boot situation after upgrading to macOS Sierra or El Capitan. Different people call it by different names but no matter what you call it, the solution to all the following problems would be the same.
  • Mac boot process stucks on Grey Screen with apple logo or a spinning wheel
  • Mac Stucks on boot screen after Sierra upgrade
  • MacBook Shows grey screen with no logo
  • Grey screen of death
  • Mac stalls on the Grey Screen at Startup
  • Apple logo and a progress bar underneath stuck at approx 3/4 
  • Mac booting to a grey screen with a spinning wheel underneath
  • Stuck on dark grey Apple logo 
  • Mac stuck in a reboot loop
  • White screen with grey Apple logo on it
Some Mac users have also reported that their machines stuck in reboot loop after upgrade and it happens like Mac boots into a grey screen with a loading bar or spinning wheel underneath and stuck there for sometimes and then it either shuts down or turns off the display to save power which sometime gets mistaken as powered off state. Let me tell you the most important information- if you see a dark grey Apple Logo with a loading bar, 90% of the chances are that the hardware are fine as it's an stage where macOS boot loader ( BootX or Boot.efi) tries to load the kernel extensions (or drivers also known as kexts) essential to run major hardware component of a Mac which then passes the control over to system processes to create user environment and show desktop or login window. So, if during the loading process, the Boot Loader encounters any incompatible kernel extension or a kernel extension from unidentified developers it halts the boot process and leaves the Mac stuck at grey screen during startup.

There could be so many possible causes to this grey screen problem, sometimes an incompatible or malfunctioning hardware attached to the Mac or low disk space on your startup disk stalls the Mac during initializing the system processes. In order to solve or understand this problem you must be aware of the booting process of a macOS systemHowever, if you simply need the solution to this Mac grey screen problem then you can jump over to the troubleshooting part described later in this article. This article gives you an in-depth knowledge of Mac booting process and reasons why your " Mac stucks on grey screen during startup and how to solve this startup problem on Mac.

In most of the cases this whole story begins after you upgrade. Upgrading to new software version is obviously an exciting exercise but who knows that it will go a bit pear-shaped. Sometimes you don't even know when and how you upgraded you Mac as it happens automatically in the background when " Install updates automatically" is selected in the App Store preferences.

Understanding Mac Boot Process

Just like Windows and Linux, Mac also has its own boot process which goes through certain phases and each phase / sequence has different screen that appears to indicate the startup progress. From pressing the power button to get into the desktop it goes through four major boot phases /sequences which are as follows.

1). Boot ROM Initialization
As soon as you press the Power button to turn the Mac on, it initializes the small program code called BootROM which controls two other sub programs called POST and EFI. They basically checks and activate all the connected hardware components essential to boot your Mac. As it does the POST, the Display remains black until the BootROM sends a video check signal which turns the screen grey. EFI selects the preferred operating system partition to use and then passes the control over to Boot Loader called Boot.efi.
    2). Executing Boot Loader
    Once the Boot.efi is loaded, it draws the “Apple logo” on the screen. The primary job of this Boot.efi file is to load the essential kernel extensions (hardware drivers also known as kexts) from its cache folder located in /System/Library/Caches/com.apple.kext.caches/Startup/kernelcache directory into main memory(RAM) and then allow the kernel to take over the system. Boot Loader starts loading the kernel extensions, a progress bar or spinning wheel appears underneath the Apple Logo on the screen indicating the progress in boot process.

    3). Kernel Initialization and Rooting
    When all the essential kernel extensions have been loaded by boot loader, it passes the control over to recently loaded kernel extensions and the user still sees the screen with grey Apple logo with a loading bar. This phase is known as Kernel initialization and the loaded kernels start loading additional drivers and the core BSD Unix system necessary to boot a Mac and then later it initializes the I/O Kit which links the loaded drivers into the kernel. At this stage the screen changes to a dark grey spinning gear right below the Apple logo. It finally mounts the System partition which is known as rooting and then passes the control over to the root system processes which show the login screen and create user interface and environment.

    4). System Initialization
    At this stage, the dark grey Apple logo is replaced by the login window or the user’s desktop background if the auto login is enabled. This phase mostly includes initializing and executing system services and creating user environment.

    So that was the shortest way to understand macOS boot process. Read the post "understanding macOS boot process" if you want to learn in depth. Now let's move on to the next topic which discusses about the reasons behind "Mac grey screen" Startup Problem or Mac stalling at Apple Logo with grey screen.

    Reasons behind Grey Screen Startup Problem or Mac stalling at Apple Logo : 

    Macs can stuck at startup due to various reasons and show different screen in every situation. This problem can occur anytime not just after upgrading to macOS Sierra but due to other various reasons as well. If you are seeing a dark grey screen with a loading bar stuck at 75 percent, or a spinning gear just underneath the Apple Logo then it is most likely that your Mac is having trouble loading kexts, drivers, or other system processes. But if you are seeing a spinning globe, a prohibitory sign, a grey screen with a flashing question mark on a folder icon, or just a black or very dark display instead, then it could be a sign of corrupt macOS, startup disk failure or any other hardware issue. This article is mainly focused on the start up problem which shows a dark grey screen with a loading bar or a spinning gear just below Apple Logo.

    After reading lots of discussions forum and supporting hundreds of users, here are the reasons that I have learned which causes the Mac stuck during boot.
    1. The installation did not process correctly.
    2. The third party kexts and drivers are not compatible with the new version of macOS.
    3. Corrupt File System or Permissions Error on startup disk
    4. No internet or insecure Wi-Fi connection during installation
    5. Low Space on Startup Disk.
    So it can be both a software or hardware related problem. Hardware related problems can be easily detected by running disk utility and hardware diagnostic test while software related issue are bit lengthy and can be fixed by following couple of troubleshooting steps. Hardware related issue can be dangerous for your data and you should immediately attempt to back up your valuable data such as Photos, contacts, email, invoices and projects to prevent it from losing. The best way to protect them is by installing macOS on an external drive and transfer data from the internal hard drive to the external one. If you have already been taking time machine backup then you need not to worry as all the data are in the backup disk and you can simply restore from time machine backup and all the issue will be fixed.

    Solution to Grey Screen Startup Problem or Mac stalling at Apple Logo

    In this tutorial we'll cover a wide range of troubleshooting tips to solve Mac grey screen problems after upgrading to macOS Sierra or El Capitan and I am sure that one of the steps mentioned below will fix the stalling or freezing of a Mac at grey screen. Please go through all the troubleshooting steps in the same order as it's written. You can simply skip the rest of the articles after the step that fixes your Mac.

    #1. Shut down, disconnect all the peripherals and restart

    Obviously, the first troubleshooting we always do is restart the Mac and see if the issue is fixed. One of the most common causes of a grey screen issue is a bad peripheral or its cable. A bad peripheral can make its associated driver software stuck in loop while it waits for the peripheral to respond to a command and thus can prevent a Mac from starting up, and cause it to stuck. So shutdown the computer first by holding the power button down for 10 seconds and the Mac will go off. Now disconnect all the peripherals (Printers, USB hub, hard drive, scanner, Camera etc.) except keyboard and mouse and try to restart. If the Mac boots successfully, then it's a problem with one of those peripherals. Plug one peripheral at a time and restart again to isolate the problem. This way you can find the problematic peripherals, which will cause the Mac to stall again at start up right after connecting it. Try without keyboard and mouse as well if the Mac does not boot even after disconnecting all other peripherals.

    Once you have found the problematic peripherals you can look for an update or try to find a solution from its manufacturer's web site and see if others are also reporting the same problem. Or you can simply replace it with a new one instead. If this step does not fix the Mac stalling at grey screen issue then move on to the next step.

    #2. Restart in Safe Mode

    It is always a good practice to start your Mac in safe mode when it doesn't boot in normal mode or have any other problem. Safe Boot in Mac is different than Safe Boot in Windows, as it attempts to fix problems while booting. Safe Boot itself fixes hundreds of problems. So start your Mac in safe Boot mode by holding the Shift key down during boot up and and see if it boots successfully.
    You may also like to read: What is safe mode and how to start your Mac in safe mode.
    Once it is booted safely, make sure
    Safe Boot is always slower but If the boot process still stuck or stall during booting in safe mode, then the problem is likely caused by a third-party kext and drivers, or your startup disk is damaged or malfunctioning. If the problem persist, follow the next step to find the problematic kext or verbose.

    #3. Boot your Mac in Verbose Mode

    Booting in verbose mode is not a problem solving step rather it's a diagnostic process. All it does is list all the extensions and drivers on the screen while they are loading during boot. So it shows the detail what’s going on in the background, similar to watching a Linux machine start up.
    Start your Mac in Verbose Mode if it stucks on Apple logo during boot
    Start your Mac in Verbose Mode if it stucks on Apple logo during boot
    To boot a Mac in verbose mode - Simply turn on or reboot it and immediately hold down ' command + v ' keys at the same time. Note down the name of the kexts, driver, or service which is the last in the list of loaded items or the one boot loader is struggling to load before the Mac goes into stall or stuck mode again. Remove the problematic kext or drivers in recovery mode.

    #4. Make sure that your Wi-Fi connection is secure and has a Unique SSID if trying to upgrade over the Wi-Fi

    If you are experiencing this "grey screen" or "Mac stalling at apple logo during boot "issue just after upgrade or in the process of upgrading to El Capitan or macOS High Sierra then it could also be an issue with internet connectivity. Make sure your internet is working - try opening any webpage on other devices connected to the same network.

    Also please note that - Apple recommends you to have the device connected through a WPA/WPA2 or WPA2-Personal secured Wi-Fi network if you are trying to contact Apple server. Apple server may reject the download request if your device is connected through an unsecured public network or a network with a common default SSID name like linksys, netgear, dlink, wireless, 2wire, xfinitywifi, and default. You can also switch from wireless to a hardwired connection.

    #5. Reset SMC and NVRAM

    Resetting SMC and PRAM fixes hundreds of problems including Apps misbehaving and hardware malfunctioning (keyboard, lights, fans, Battery, Charger) and slow Mac despite low CPU load. SMC manages the power specific settings and customization ranging from screen brightness levels and settings for peripheral attached to Mac to settings in Energy Saver like auto-dimming based on lighting and power sources, sleep when idle, screen sleep behavior, etc.
    Sometimes, after upgrading to El Capitan or macOS Sierra, you may need to reset SMC for the settings to become compatible with the new macOS. Resetting them does not risk the loss of any data or other adverse effect. Resetting SMC and NVRAM are a simple task of holding "CTRL+Shift+Option" keys and "Command+Option + P + R" keys respectively. So just go ahead and fire these action without any worry. Resetting NVRAM is always recommended when you're experiencing issues with startup problem, Mac stalling at grey screen,  startup disk or any kernel process panics. Both of these components are important for your Mac to run it properly, but once they get corrupted, things gets cranky. If your Mac doesn't boot after Sierra upgrade, you should reset SMC and PRAM.
    To reset SMC read the post on "How to Reset SMC?".
    To Reset PRAM read the post on " How to reset PRAM?".

    #6. Startup Disk Selection

    As mentioned earlier resetting NVRAM affect the settings for startup disk so post resetting the NVRAM , you may need to select the correct working startup disk specially if you have more than one operating system or hard disk installed on a Mac.
    So simply start your Mac normally and hold down the "Option" key as the computer starts. You will see an option to select the desired operating system or startup disk from the list. Use the left or right arrow keys to make selection and press the "Return / Enter" key to boot from it.

    #7. Use Disk Utility in Recovery Mode

    Disk utility can turn out to be the most useful tool when a Mac is in no boot situation or it boots to a grey screen and stuck on Apple logo with a loading bar. 50% of the troubleshooting is performed here in disk utility and thus it's a key to resolve such problems. Here are the Major task that we perform when in disk utility in context of grey screen startup problem.
    1). Repair Startup Disk
    2). Repair Disk Permissions.
    3). Check the Free Space on Startup Disk
    4). Perform Disk Management ( Restoring, Partitioning, or Erasing the disk)

    Repairing startup disk and disk permissions

    Turn the Mac on and immediately press and hold "Command+ R" keys together or simply hold down the option key as the computer starts and then select Recovery HD to boot your Mac from recovery partition. If it doesn't boot from Recovery Partition, jump over to the next section.
    Once the Mac has booted from recovery partition, you may be asked to select the language, choose English(US) and click arrow key at the bottom to continue. Now select disk utility from the four macOS utilities options and hit continue again. You will see exactly the same Disk utility as it appears in macOS environment when boots normally. One of the most important checks you should perform here is verify the SMART status of the startup disk. So select the name of the startup disk (that also shows the make of and Capacity of the hard drive) from the left pane and not the volume which appears indented below the drive, then look for "Smart Status" on the bottom right side. If it shows anything other than Verified, then it is most likely the problem with startup disk and you should immediately take the backup of your disk and replace it.

    If the smart status shows verified then select the startup disk from the left and click on "First Aid" tab from the top tools bar and then click on run and continue to perform disk check and repair on startup disk. Disk utility will now verify disk for any error, corruption in file system, permissions error, corrupt directory entries and other problems related to files and directories, etc. If it finds any problem, it will try to repair it and if it can not repair the problem it will suggest to format the disk and reinstall macOS as a fresh, which you won't like to do before taking backup of the disk. At this point, you can either take the backup of the disk using restore option in the disk utility or install macOS Sierra on an external USB hard drive then copy all the data from the original startup disk to the external hard drive and then erase the startup disk and reinstall macOS on the original internal startup disk again. For more detailed information on verifying and repairing your Mac's startup drive using disk utility in recovery mode, read this post.


    Remember that, older Mac OS X v10.10 and below used to have two separate task buttons under First Aid tab, which were repair disk and repair disk permissions but the OS X El Capitan and above has got this eliminated to just one first Aid button which does the both tasks.

    Checking available Space on Startup Disk

    When you turn the Mac on it actually loads the essential programs like drivers, hardware extensions or kexts, user interface such as Finder and various other apps which are temporarily stored in physical memory (also called RAM) and a part of the RAM is virtually allocated on the startup disk to which it swap information between, so your Mac must have enough free space on the startup disk for virtual RAM to swap or exchange the information in order to make computer operational. 

    When we are already in disk utility, why not we check the free disk space on startup disk, also, as this could be another reason to grey screen startup problem. When you select the startup disk on the left pane in disk utility, you would be able to see the available free space on the bottom right hand side. Make sure you have enough space available for macOS to boot and work properly. You should have at least 10GB of free space. If you have enough space then skip and move on to the next step.

    If the available space is less than 5 GB, you must delete some unwanted or duplicate files or stuff that you already have backed up somewhere else, too. If the Mac were able to start in safe mode, it would have been easier to free up disk space on startup disk as you could have simply gone to different folders, checked the unwanted file and deleted them and finally emptied the trash to claim more space. But my assumption at this point is that the Mac couldn't boot even in safe mode and so the only option left to you is use recovery mode. So, follow the steps mentioned below to free up some disk space.

    How to free up disk space in recovery mode when your Mac doesn't boot to safe mode or normal mode.

    1. Simply boot to recovery mode by holding "CMD+R" keys during starts up.
    2. Go to Utilities menu up at the top and select terminal.
    3. Type "ls /Volumes" to list all the mounted volume or partition.
    4. Note down the exact name of your startup disk, in most of the cases it is named as " Macintosh HD"
    5. Now type " cd /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Users/" and then type " ls " to list the home folders of all the users on Mac. Double check every command for typo before executing it as it could be dangerous and lead to data lose. Also its a good practice to use ls command every time to list all files and directories of a folder to be sure that you are in the right working directory and it contains the item you want to delete.
    6. In order to free up space on your startup disk, you will need to delete unwanted files/folders. If you have more than one user account and you do not need anything stored by the other account you can simply delete the home folder belonging to the unwanted account. It can free up gigabytes of space. Type the following commands to delete all the contents of that user.

    rm -rf user_name  (replace user_name with the real name of the home folder belonging to unwanted user account)

    7. Delete users logs and caches - Type "cd Library" and hit return and then type "ls" to make sure you have the logs and Caches folder. Type the following command.

    rm -rf Logs/*
    rm -rf Caches/*

    it will take some time to delete all the contents and return the prompt again once the command is executed.

    8. You can also clear the downloads folder if not required as it mostly contains the stuff that you can download again. To clear the downloads folder - come out of the library folder first by typing the following command
    cd ..
    rm -rf Downloads/*
    Similarly, you can delete some files/folders from desktop and documents folder after checking the list using "ls" command.

    9. Similarly you can go to Movies and iTunes folder under library to delete some videos and iTunes backup files to quickly recover gigabytes of space. Refer to the article " Startup disk is almost full issue" to find out their location and other such files to delete.

    10. Now to go to Applications folder and list all the applications you have installed. Delete or remove those you do not need to claim some more space.You may find the installation files of previously downloaded macOS version which is taking more than 5GB of precious disk space.So, type these commands to delete them.
    cd /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Applications
    ls
    rm -rf "Install macOS High Sierra Beta.app" (Type the name with quotes)

    When you are in the /Application folder, also look for any Antivirus or security software. If there is any delete them permanently as they are not required at all.

    10. Finally after deleting all the unwanted items you need to come back to the user's home folder and clear trash. To clear trash in recovery mode, type the command written below.
    cd /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Users/replace_user_name
    rm -rf .Trash/*

    Here are the sample of those terminal commands that I used in recovery mode. So, once you have deleted the all junks and unwanted files, quit terminal and go to disk utility and verify if the startup disk has enough free disk space. Finally, restart the Mac and check if it boots normally.

    What if your Mac doesn't boot from Recovery Partition either

    If the Mac is not booting from recovery partition either, chances are that it's startup disk is damaged or your Mac did not have a recovery partition. You can further read this post to check if your Mac has a recovery partition. Now the options left to you are
    1). Try booting from macOS recovery USB drive if you created one earlier and then repair and clean your original startup disk.
    2). Run disk cleanup and file system check in single user mode.

    Important Note :-  Disable SIP

    In order to fix grey screen startup problem, you may not be able to delete some unwanted stuff like unwanted applications, third party kernels(Kexts) or hardware drivers files or any other system protected files from recovery mode or Single user mode(SUM). This is because, starting from OS X El Capitan ver 10.11, Apple introduced a new feature called System Integrity Protection ( SIP, also knows as rootless) which actually prevents anyone from editing, deleting or moving any system protected files including kernel extensions( kexts) or hardware drivers. If you need to edit or delete them you must disable or turn the SIP feature off.

    To Disable System Integrity Protection:
    Disable SIP to make changes to System files
    Disable SIP to make changes to System files in case of no boot situation like grey screen with Apple logo

    #8. Run file system Check in Single User Mode

    Single user mode is a stripped down version of your real macOS which boots a Mac into minimal environment with basic OS kernel, and the processes for normal graphical interface, most of the system daemons and network services does not run. It actually boots the Machine from the original macOS partition ( Root Partition or default Startup Disk) and not from the recovery partition. In SUM, your Mac is booted with default superuser account known as root and does not require any password. However, If you have the FileVault enabled, it shows a login window before loading the single user environment and ask for the administrator password who encrypted the hard drive using FileVault. If you want to verify the name of startup disk or the disk name your Mac booted from in single user mode, simply type the following command when you get to the command line prompt saying root#.

    localhost:/ root# system_profiler SPSoftwareDataType

    To boot a Mac in SUM, Simply turn on or reboot it and immediately hold down ' Command + S ' keys at the same time. Continue holding the keys until you see white text line scrolling on black screen. Now wait until all the text line is done scrolling past and you see the command-line prompt saying "root#". 

    Now type the command "fsck -fy" to check and repair the file system on startup disk.
    File System Check and Repair
    File System Check and Repair in SUM
     The command will start checking the file system and go through five different checks which may take several minutes to complete. Once completed, it would show one of two messages: "FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED" or "The volume [Boot Volume Name] appears to be OK" If you get the first message saying file system was modified then run the same command again and keep running it until you get the message "The volume [Boot Volume Name] appears to be OK."
    File System Check in SUM in case of Mac boot processes stuck on loading bar
    File System Check in Single user Mode in case of Mac boot processes stuck on loading bar
    Once you get to the second message saying the volume appears to be ok, type "reboot" and wait to see if computer boots successfully.

    Note:- In this mode the boot disk isn't fully mounted. So in order to fix various other issues with startup disk you need to first mount the disk in read / write access mode. Type the following command to enable write access.
    mount -uw /

    If it is still stalling at grey screen with Apple logo during boot then restart your Mac in single user mode and type the following command to clear boot caches, third party kexts (kernel extensions) and driver.

    mount -uw /
    rm -rf /System/Library/Caches/*
    rm /private/var/db/BootCache*
    rm -rf /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Library/Caches/com.apple*
    reboot

    If this reboots your Mac successfully, it means that the Mac is fixed and does not require any further troubleshooting but if it's still getting stuck at grey screen with Apple logo then follow the next step to find and remove incompatible kernel extensions ( kexts) using terminal in recovery mode.

    You can also do the other disk clean up and maintenance task in here if the Mac is unable to boot in recovery mode or if it does not have recovery partition. Both the SUM and the terminal in recovery mode accept same commands for cleanup and maintenance task, the only difference is the boot disk. Single user mode boots from original startup disk while the system recovery boots a Mac from recovery partition. So, in case your Mac is unable to boot due to low disk space, then boot it to SUM and delete logs, caches, unwanted applications, unwanted files, folders, or videos from different locations like (Desktop, Documents, and Downloads).

    #9. Remove incompatible Kernel Extensions (.kexts) and third party drivers

    As mentioned in step 3, if your Mac is still stalling or getting stuck on Apple logo with a loading bar due to an incompatible kernel extension(kext) or driver that is unable to load, then try to find the problematic kext or driver by booting your Mac in verbose mode. Once you have found the problematic kext, or you have already tried all the above steps, boot your Mac in recovery mode and start terminal to remove those problematic kexts or drivers. if you are unable to boot in recovery mode then try single user mode.

    If your Mac can boot into recovery mode:

    1. Boot into recovery mode and open terminal window as mentioned in step 7.
    2. Type "ls /Volumes" to list all the mounted volumes or partitions.
    3. Note down the exact name of your normal startup disk, in most of the cases it is named as " Macintosh HD"
    4. Now type ' cd /Volumes/"Macintosh HD" ' and then type " ls " to list all the folders and directories.
    5. Now create a new folder/directory to  move the problematic kext and driver into it so that they are backed up, just in case you need them. Type the following command.
    mkdir /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/kextbackup

    6. Now navigate to the folder where all the kext and drivers are stored and list them to find any third party unwanted extensions and drivers.
    cd /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/System/Library/Extensions
    ls

    7. Now here you will see a list of all the third party kexts and drivers and you can delete those you don't need or those you can download again, for example kexts or drivers for printers, scanner, camera, wireless card, USB data card, fingerprint reader, kexts or drivers for third party sound mixing device, etc.

    Some of the users have reported that they have got this issue fixed after removing some kernel extensions from previous version of OS X which were related to hp printer drivers, some USB to serial drivers, Cisco drivers, Huawei Data card driver, etc. here are the list of some incompatible or problematic kexts which were reported by different Mac users on different online support forum.

    Belcarra.USBLAN_netpart.kext
    Belcarra.USBLAN_usbpart.kext
    HuaweiDataCardDriver.kext
    JMicronATA.kext
    RemoteControl.USBLAN_usbpart.kext
    UsbEthernetGadget.kext
    USBExpressCardCantWake_Huawei.kext
    vecLib.kext
    ElmediaPlayer.kext
    EltimaAsync.kext
    VBox.kext

    If you find them in the list of installed kexts on your Mac, it is recommended that you remove them from the following locations.
    /Library/Extensions
    /System/Library/Extensions
    /Library/StartupItems

    Notes:-
    1. You must disable the System Integrity Protection(SIP) as mentioned above, before you can edit, move, or delete any kexts or system protected files.
    2. If you are confused and not sure what to remove and which one could be the problematic one, then simply move or delete all those kext which are not from Apple. Remove all the third part kext leaving only default kext or drivers which are installed with a fresh macOS installation. Just make sure that you do not move any of the kexts file whose name begins with APPLE*.kext or IO*.kext. For your convenient, here is a list of all the default kext in /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Library/Extensions/ folder on macOS Sierra. This is the list I prepared from my Mac after fresh macOS Sierra install.

    8. Now you have the list and you can find the third party kext, so just move the third party kext into kextbackup folder. To move a particular third party kext, use the following command.

    mv KEXTNAME.kext /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/kextbackup/

    Once you have moved all the unwanted kext and drivers, try to reboot your Mac and see if it boots successfully. Type the command "reboot".

    Try Single user mode if your Mac can't boot into recovery mode:

    1. Try booting into Single user mode as explained in Step 8.
    2. Create a kextbackup folder and move the unwanted kexts and drivers into it. Use the following commands.

    mount -uw /
    cd /System/Library/Extensions
    ls
    mkdir kextbackup
    mv KEXTNAME.kext kextbackup
    rm -rf /System/Library/Caches/*
    rm -rf /Volumes/"Macintosh HD"/Library/Caches/*

    3. Type "reboot" to restart it normally. If is still does not boot and stuck on Apple logo with a loading bar then move on to the next step.

    #10. Reinstall macOS

    If you have already tried all the steps mentioned above and your Mac still stuck on Apple logo with a loading bar then it's time to reinstall macOS Sierra. Simple re-installation of macOS Sierra does not harm any of your file or data until you do clean re-installation. Reinstallation of macOS will also fix issues with the system files if they are corrupt or damaged.

    To Reinstall macOS Sierra:

    Restart your Mac and hold down "Cmd+R " together until you see grey Apple Logo. Make sure you're connected to the Internet, select your preferred language from the list and click continue. Select "Reinstall macOS " and click "Continue." Follow the onscreen instructions to complete the installation.

    #11. Restore from Time Machine Backup

    If you have already tried reinstalling macOS and the Mac still does not boot then try restoring it from Time Machine backup as mentioned here. Restore it to an older date when it was working perfectly fine and the date after which you have successfully restarted your Mac. Restoring from Time Machine backup actually erase your whole disk first and then copy everything from backup disk.

    #12. Clean Reinstall macOS or do Internet Recovery

    If normal re-installation does not work and you do not have Time Machine Backup then the only option for you is do clean installation or internet recovery.
    Please note that all the data on the hard drive will be erased in the following troubleshooting so you are required to take backup if you have any important data on the Mac. You can copy data to an external hard drive using terminal command or SUM or Install macOS on an external hard drive then boot from the external hard drive and copy data from your Mac over to the external drive. Once the data have been copied, erase the external hard drive and reinstall macOS as mentioned in Step 10.

    If for some reason the internal drive has corrupt file system and does not allow you to reinstall macOS to an external hard drive. You can do internet recovery and boot it directly from Apple' server.
    To boot your Mac from Internet Recovery:
    • Turn off the Mac. 
    • Turn it back on and hold down "Option+Command+R" key immediately. Keep them held until you see a moving earth icon.
    • If it ask to connect to a WiFi network. Select your home network and connect.
    • Make sure the power adapter is connected in case its a MacBook.
    • Once the recovery information is loaded onto your Mac, you get the macOS Utilities option where you can select "reinstall macOS" and the external hard drive as the destination.

    #13. Check for hardware issue

    This is going to be the last resort to fix the issue - Mac stalling at grey screen with Apple logo. Sometimes low physical memory(RAM), faulty hard drive or lose connection to internal hard drive, or a faulty video card also causes your Mac to stall at boot. If you have already tried all the steps mentioned above and nothing seems to be working and you really need to buy new stuff then try the following steps.

    1. Increase the memory (RAM)
    if you just have 2GB RAM installed. If you have 4 GB of RAM and you run software or application that has higher memory usage like Adobe Photoshop, AutoCAD etc. then consider upgrading the memory to 8 GB.
    Here is how you can upgrade memory in your MacBook. If it's a MacBook Air then I would recommend you to take it to any nearby Apple Store.

    2. Disconnect and Reconnect the hard drive
    When you open the back cover of your Mac to upgrade the Memory, at the same time, also disconnect and reconnect the internal hard drive to make sure it doesn't have any loose connection problem.

    #14. Check the Video Card for any Fault

    There are few iMac and Macbook Pro model which had known issue with Video Card. Apple had accepted the fault and also conducted a recall program for the affected model.

    This issue was first time detected in 27-inch, Mid 2011 iMac model with 3.1 GHz quad-core Intel Core i5 or 3.4 GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processors and AMD Radeon 6970 Video Card. This recall program has already ended and is no longer available but if you have the same iMac model and it wasn't replaced by Apple then you should take it to the store for out of warranty repair which may cost you hundreds of dollars.

    Another Similar recall program is still available for MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) and MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Early 2013) which were manufactured between Mid 2012 and Early 2013.

    Here are the Symptoms in affected model:
    • Black screen or no Video on the computer screen(or external display) even though the computer is on
    • Scrambled or distorted video on the computer screen
    • Computer restarts unexpectedly
    The program covers affected MacBook Pro models until four years from its original date of purchase. You can check the eligibility for free repair or replacement of your MacBook pro on this page.

    If your Mac model doesn't come under the recall program and you get this far, I'm sure you are dealing with a hardware fault and you should make a "Genius appointment" at any nearest Apple store.

    *******End of Article*********
    incoming Search Term:
    Mac grey screen, Mac stuck on Grey screen with apple logo during boot after installing macOS Sierra, Causing the boot process to hang, MacBook Pro stuck on Apple logo with a spinning wheel, Stuck on boot screen after Sierra update, MacBook grey screen on startup, MacBook pro grey screen no logo, MacBook pro grey screen of death, Mac stalls on the grey screen at startup, Stuck on grey screen after boot, machines stuck in a reboot loop, white screen with grey Apple logo on it
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    Understanding Mac boot Process

    Sunday, September 24, 2017 0
    Understanding Mac Boot Process

    Just like Windows and Linux, Mac also has its own boot process which goes through certain phases and each phase / sequence has different screen that appears to indicate the startup progress. From pressing the power button to get into the desktop it goes through four major boot phases /sequences which are as follows.
    Mac boot Process
    Mac Boot Process

    1). Boot ROM Initialization
    • As soon as you press the Power button to turn your Mac on, it sends the electric signals to the Main Logicboard ( also called Motherboard) which initializes the small program code called BootROM and makes the memory(RAM) usable. BootROM controls two other sub programs called POST and EFI.
    • BootROM first performs POST( Power On Self Test) which checks and activate all other hardware components essential to boot your Mac. It also verifies if the sufficient memory(RAM) is available and in a good condition and produces the startup sound (with a Single beep, also called chimes sound) signalling all the essential hardware are working otherwise you hear additional beeps indicating possible hardware failure which halts the startup process. As it does the POST, the Display remains black.
    • After the POST has been completed, your BootROM sends a video check signal to built-in or connected displays and when it does so the screen turns gray at this point in Mac boot process.
    • A subset of BootROM which is called EFI (Extensible Firmware Interface) then selects the preferred operating system partition to use.
    • If more than one operating system is found then it loads the last selected operating system under system preferences. At this stage a user can hold down the option key causing the EFI to display the choices of operating systems available.This whole process completes so quickly within few seconds that if a user wants to get the operating system selection screen he/she needs to hold the option key as soon as he presses the Power button. 
    2). Executing Boot Loader
    • Once the macOS partition has been selected, Boot ROM passes the control over to the Boot Loader file called Boot.efi ( earlier known as BootX) which is located in /System/Library/CoreServices folder on the root partition.
    • Once the Boot.efi file (Boot Loader) is found, it draws the “Apple logo” on the screen.
    • The primary job of this Boot.efi file is to load the essential kernel extensions (hardware drivers also known as kexts) from its cache folder located in /System/Library/Caches/com.apple.kext.caches/Startup/kernelcache directory into main memory(RAM) and then allow the kernel to take over the system.
    • This cache is like the last knows good configuration in Windows and holds exactly the same set of kernel extensions which were used during the previous successful boot. If the Boot Loader could not load any of these extensions from kernelcache due to missing, damage, or unusable state it then goes through a list of whole bunch of kexts and drivers stored in /System/Library/Extensions folder and look for and load all those kexts whose attribute is set to a value which is required during boot. The later process is very time consuming as boot loader goes through each kexts and driver to check whether its required during boot or not.
    • When the Boot Loader starts loading the kernel extensions, a progress bar or spinning wheel appears underneath the Apple Logo on the screen indicating the progress in boot process.
    • However, if the FileVault encryption is turned on, the Boot Loader draws the login window on the screen asking for the FileVault password first before it loads any kernel extensions. The administrator of the computer needs to put in the FileVault password to enable access to the encrypted disk to boot from it. This login windows is shown later otherwise.
    3). Kernel Initialization and Rooting
    • As we read earlier that Boot.efi (the Boot Loader) finds the System Folder on your startup disk and loads the kernel extensions into main memory(RAM). Once it has loaded all the essential kernel extensions, it passes the control over to recently loaded kernel extensions and the user still sees the screen with grey Apple logo with a loading bar. 
    • This phase is known as kernel initialization as the previously downloaded kexts starts loading additional drivers and the core BSD Unix system necessary to boot your Mac and then later it initializes the I/O Kit which links the loaded drivers into the kernel. At this stage the screen changes to a dark gray spinning gear right below the Apple logo.
    • At this stage, enough drivers are loaded for the kernel to find the root device. Once the root device is found, the kernel roots itself off of BSD and mounts the system partition as the root, or top-level, file system which is also known as rooting.
    • After the root partition is mounted, the kernel passes the control over to the root system processes which show the login screen and create user interface and environment.This process is known as System Initialization.
    4). System Initialization
    • This is the stage where the dark gray Apple logo is replaced by the login window or the user’s desktop background if the auto login is enabled.
    • Root system processes take over the control from kernel and start the first non-kernel process called Launchd, located at /sbin/launchd, which has the process identification number (PID) as 1 and runs as root. It runs as a parent process and brings forth several other child processes.
    • So the prime job of the Launchd process is to complete the system initialization and start all other processes responsible to create user interface and environment. Three major processes for creating user environment are "loginwindow", "SystemStarter" and "user launchd" which then handle various other tasks including display of the login window, and execution of system script and startup items.
    Just for your information- Here is how we compare the boot process in Mac, Windows and Linux. 
    Comparison of Boot Process in Mac, Windows and Linux
    Comparison of Boot Process in Mac, Windows and Linux
    So that was the easiest way to understand macOS boot process. There are still hundreds of other small processes that initiates and runs during each four boot sequence that I can not include them in the tutorial as the inclusion will make it more complex to understand. This article is mainly intended for those users who are having trouble in Mac boot process or trying to fix the issue when Mac stuck or stall at gray screen with Apple logo.
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    Saturday, September 23, 2017

    How to Setup a Chromecast device and Convert your normal HDTV into a Smart TV?

    Saturday, September 23, 2017 0
    Chromecast can convert your normal HDTV into Smart TV just in $39.
    Cast your favorite entertainment, YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, Hotstar or Prime Video straight from your phone or iPad to TV.
    If you are planning to buy a Smart TV this festive season, you must read this post before you end up spending a fortune to it. Why spend so much money when you can get the same quality and same features just for $39.
    How to Setup a Chromecast device and Convert your normal HDTV into a Smart TV ?
    How to Setup a Chromecast device and Convert your normal HDTV into a Smart TV ?
    Compatibility : Compatible with most of the iPhone/iPod/iPad and all Android devices, Easily cast all your favorite games and TV shows, Unlimited TV shows and movies upto 200,000 shows.
    Supported OS: (Android 4.1+, iOS 7.0+, Windows 7, Mac OS X 10.7 or Chrome OS).
    Warranty: 1 Year
    Price: $39 or $69 (For Chromecast Ultra- Stream in 4K ultra HD with HDR)

    Buy From Google : https://www.google.com/intl/en_us/chromecast/

    Buy From FlipKart ( For Indian Users) : Buy just for ₹2,799 from FlipKart 

    The  trend of using Smart TVs has recently picked up the momentum. The only problem with good smart TVs are that they can not be afforded by everyone as they're expensive. But if you have a high definition TV with a spare HDMI port you can easily convert it to a SMART TV at a nominal price and probably save a lot money.


    The Google Chromecast is the cheapest and the simplest way to stream video content from your PC, Mac, Android or iPhone right to your TV. It works exactly like the Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV or Roku but has more features than all.

    Here is how Google defines Chromecast:-

    What is Chromecast?
    What is Chromecast?
    The less complex and multi-featured streaming device - Google’s ChromeCast. The ChromeCast is more than just a conduit which passes streaming video from cloud to a TV or Display using your mobile phone as remote control. The device comes with a dual-band WiFi which can work on both 2.4 G and 5 G Wi-Fi with 802.11 b/g/n/ac network technologies.

    The device has brought enhancement in the latest TV technology. It comes in two different hardware versions known as ChromeCast 2 (For $39) and ChromeCast Ultra (For $69) which can be bought from Google's official website. In India Flipkart is offering this ChromeCast 2 just for ₹2,799 after 17% discount running due to festive season.


    ChromeCast Ultra has support for High Dynamic Range that could unleash the rich contrast and saturation. The one looking to stream in 4K ultra HD with HDR can have this Ultra Google ChromeCast for $69 but your TV should also support 4K display in order to make most of it.

    Why should you buy Chromecast?

    Suppose you have subscribed to video streaming services like Netflix, Amazon Prime or Hulu, or you have got them free with your Internet and TV connection as a promotional offer from service provider, but you do not have a SMART TV to run those Video streaming apps. So you will be totally dependent on your PC, Mac, iPhone, Tablet or any other Smart phone screen which are smaller or not as big as your TV screen. Also you don't want to stare these screen from close proximity and destroy your eyesight. It would have been much pleasant experience, if you could watch those content of your choice on your HDTV and convert it to a Smart TV that would also allow you to play game or watch movies, TV shows or Sports event anytime at your convenience. Well, If you are thinking the same then Chromecast will be the miracle device for you.

    Chromecast Setup Guide:

    Requirement : 
    • A Chromecast device
    • A high-definition television (HDTV) or a display device with an HDMI input
    • Access to a secure wireless internet network and an available power outlet
    Adding the ChromeCast is as simple as clicking on the device icon at the top right, and going through the setup instructions.

    Setting up and Connecting to ChromeCast

    1. Plug one end of the USB cable into your Chromecast device and the other end of the cable into the power outlet. Use only the original USB cable and power adapter that came with the box for optimal performance.
    2. Now Plug your Chromecast into any of the available HDMI input on your TV.
      Setting up and Connecting to ChromeCast
      Setting up and Connecting to ChromeCast
    3. Wait for the Chromecast connection home screen to show up on your TV screen. If the Chromecast home screen doesn't show up on your TV after setting up Chromecast, try changing the signal Input Source using button on your TV’s remote control.
      Chromecast Setup Home Screen
      Setup Chromecast to Stream contents straight from your PC, Smartphone, or iPhone to TV 
    4. Once you see the Chromecast home screen, you are ready to connect and setup your streamer or casting device to work with ChromeCast.
    If you want to cast from a Windows, Mac or Chromebook computer, you just need to open Google Chrome browser and no other apps. Make sure you're using the latest version of Chrome by going into “Settings > About Google Chrome.”
    • So, open Chrome browser and type chrome://cast/#setup/ in the address bar and hit enter to load Chromecast device search.
    • Once the Chromecast device is connected to the power outlet and HDMI port at the back of your HDTV, it will temporarily broadcast its own WiFi hotspot which is open and insecure without any password so that any device trying to connect can join the available open WiFi network.
    • Now your Chrome browser will look for Chromecast devices that is ready to setup.
      Setting up Google Chromecast from Chrome Browser on a PC
      Setting up Google Chromecast from Chrome Browser on a PC
    • Once found, It will show the name of the Chromecast device which may appear something like Chromecast XXXX. So select the device and click "Set Me Up".
    • If it doesn't connect automatically then you will be asked to join the new network manually by going into the WiFi menu on your Windows laptop and selecting the Wi-Fi network that matches your Chromecast device name.
    • Now click next and follow the simple setup wizard. During setup you can change the name of your Chromecast device by typing in a new name (For example, MyRoom) or you can leave it as the default name. Choose your country. Click "Looks Good."
    • Now Choose your home Wi-Fi network name from the drop down menu > Enter WiFI password and click Connect.
    • Once you have connected the Chromecast to the WiFi , Click Next.
    • Now your Chromecast is ready to cast from any Chromecast enabled app on any device like Windows, Mac, Android, iPhone, or iPad.

    How to Cast screen or a Video from Mac or Windows PC

    To cast your Mac or Windows PC screen you must have Google Chrome browser.
    • Make sure your Mac or Windows PC is connected to the same WiFi network as your Chromecast device.
    • Now open Google Chrome browser or any other Chromecast-enabled app on your Mac or PC.
    • Tap on cast button  Inactive cast extension  on the upper right corner. If you do not see the cast button in your browser then click the Chrome Settings menuMore menu iconon the upper right hand corner and select "Cast.."
      Cast your Windows PC or Mac screen to a Chromecast device
      Cast your Windows PC or Mac screen to a Chromecast device
    • Select the source - a single Chrome Tab or the Whole Desktop Screen by clicking on the upside down arrow.
      Cast a Tab or the whole desktop Screen
      Cast a Tab or the whole desktop Screen
    • Now select the Chromecast device name to cast the screen or a Tab to it. And the content will now be appeared on your TV screen.
    For detailed help and support article on Chromecast you can also visit this knowledge base from Google.
    You can also read the article from Google- Casting a Chrome tab or entire desktop

    How to Setup and Cast screen or a Video from an Android Device

    To cast your Android Phone Screen to a Chromecast Device: 
    • Make sure your Android device is connected to the same WiFi network as your Chromecast device.
    • Make sure your Chromecast device is connected to your TV and you have selected the correct source for signal input.
    • Now you need to download an App called Google Home to set up and cast your Android screen to a Chromecast enabled TV or device.After the App is installed, Accept the license agreement and sign in with your google account.
      Download Google Home app to Setup Chromecast from an Android Phone
      Download Google Home app to Setup Chromecast from an Android Phone
    • Now tap on the Devices  icon on the top right corner of the screen.
    • If it asks to enable location services for Google Home App, tap Allow.
      Use Google Home App to mange and cast to Chromecast devices
      Use Google Home App to mange and cast to Chromecast devices
    • Now it will look for the available Chromecast devices and list them to choose from. Choose the Chromecast you want to establish a connection with. Tap Set Up > Continue. 
    • If the app can’t connect to a Chromecast device, come closer to the Chromecast and select "Try Again".
    • Once the Google Home app is successfully connected to the Chromecast, tap Continue and make sure the code displayed on TV screen and on your Phone screen matches.
    • Here again you need to choose the WiFi, you want the Chromecast to connect to. If you are running Android 5.0 and above then the WiFi password will automatically be fetched from your phone and applied to Chromecast.
    • When the Chromecast is connected to the same WiFi, You can cast your Android screen to the TV. Simply click on the three parallel lines on the top left corner of the app's home screen > Select Inactive cast extension  Cast Screen / Audio > Select the device you want to cast screen to.
    • Now the whole screen content will appear on your HDTV too.You can also cast the video directly from the YouTube or other Chromecast enabled apps.

    How to Setup and Cast screen or a Video from an iPhone or iPad

    Setting up and connecting to Chromecast device from iOS is also same as in Android.
    • First Make sure your iOS device is connected to the same WiFi network as your Chromecast device.
    • Install the Google Home app from iTunes Store and accept the license agreement.
    • The app will ask to turn the Bluetooth on so Tap to "Turn on Bluetooth" or alternatively you can connect your iOS Device to the WiFi network broadcasted by Chromecast device which may appear with a name similar to Chromecast1234.x.
    • After you are connected to the Chromecast's open WiFi > Go back to the Google Home app.
    • Now tap on the Devices icon on the top right corner of the screen and choose the device you want to establish connection with.
    • When it is connected successfully, Touch Continue.
    • Currently you are connected to Chromecast in Guest Mode. Uncheck the option "enable guest mode" if you don't want anyone else to cast to your TV, and tap on continue.
    • Now you need to have your Chromecast devices connected to the secure WiFi network. So select the home WiFi network > Enter password and Tap Done.
    • Your devices are now ready to cast. Simply open the Chromecast enabled app like YouTube, HBO Now, Netflix, or Hulu, etc. and tap the Cast icon.
    Note :  If you're having trouble streaming video to your Chromecast device from a PC, Android or iOS device withing the same network. Try using in Guest mode and see if it works. If it works fine in guest mode then it could be your WiFi router which is blocking the data transmission or protocol. Here are some checklist that your router must have.
    • Use the 2.4 GHz / 5 GHz WiFi to connect all the home devices
    • Make sure the router is within 10-15 feet of your Chromecast device.
    • Disable Access Point (AP) Client isolation, Proxy Servers, VPN and IGMP Proxy.
    • Enable Universal Plug and Play ( UPnP), Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) and multicast.
    • If you do not know how to do it or can not find the option, Please contact your internet service provider or router Manufacturer as each router has different settings and configuration.
    • If you’re using a BT Hub, consider turning off the Smart Setup feature in the router settings and reset the Chromecast.
    If you are still having trouble connecting or casting to Chromecast from your Mac, PC, Android or iPhone then Contact Chromecast Support Team.

    This was all about casting a video or whole screen of your computer, Android or iOS device to a bigger TV screen using Google's Chromecast. This also convert your normal HDTV into a Smart TV as it brings other Apps like Netflix, Hulu, HBO and Youtube, etc. that can connect to internet and stream from their cloud service directly. You can also use it for training purpose as you can cast your Whole Mac, Windows PC or iPad screen to the bigger screen for bigger audience. This device is also very affordable as price start from just $39.


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    Thursday, September 7, 2017

    What Happens When an iOS Spyware is Installed on an iPhone?

    Thursday, September 07, 2017 0

    If you suspect your smartphone is being spied on, you are not alone. Millions of people across the globe have voiced this concern on the subject of privacy over the past few years. It gives you chills every single time you think people can snoop on your cell phone without you being aware of it. The worst part is it’s hard to detect if your device has been hacked. Since the latest breed of espionage apps gathers all the information without giving users a hint. Today, there are some very powerful spy apps available on the market that can tap into any mobile phone. But why would anyone spy on you? It’s a question that is raised by many, especially those who have been a victim of spying. Well, bugging happens at all sorts of levels from anonymous everyday people to political worthies. Perhaps you have some important information that someone else wants. If you are in business, it could be details related to your sales strategies, product development and so on. It could be related to a court case or your partner may want to find out if you are engaged in an extramarital affair.

    However, if you have lived all your life under a rock, the concept of you being pried upon possibly seem absurd and outlandish. But for some people keeping tabs on others is a way of life. In fact, in this age of technology, it’s easier than ever to spy on someone. If you have given away your iCloud credentials or your phone is being handheld by someone there is a possibility that a backdoor app may have been installed on your device to piggyback your GPS service or spyware has been setup on your device to keep an eye on your activities.
    iOS Spyware can track your location
    iOS Spyware can track your location

    What Happens When an iOS Spyware is Installed on an iPhone?
    What Happens When an iOS Spyware is Installed on an iPhone?
    Before we get into details, let me clearly state that there are two main ways to tap into iOS devices:
    • Using a No-Jailbreak Version
    • Using a Jailbreak Version

    1. Using a No-Jailbreak Version of a Spy App

    The fairly recent method is only available from a handful of providers like xnspy.com. The key benefit of a no-jailbreak version of an iOS spyware is it doesn’t bound you to access the target device physically and install the program on the phone to gather information. It works by catching the backups sent using Cupertino-based firm’s free iCloud backup service. It requires you to have the Apple ID and password of the person you wish to track. This frees you from the worry of manually installing the app on the device. However, the spying method gives limited reported compared to the regular spy software or jailbreak edition. But the main point is it actually lets you spy on an iPhone without jailbreaking.

    iOS Spyware can record the sounds surrounding of your targeted phone
    iOS Spyware can record the sounds surrounding of your targeted phone

    2. Using a Jailbreak Version of a Spy App

    Jailbreaking is a process of bypassing Apple’s strict built-in rules on installing programs from sources other than Appstore. A jailbreak version of a spy app requires manual installation on the target iPhone. To use this version first, you must jailbreak the iPhone. The other important thing to remember is that things keep changing – it’s more like a competition – Apple updates its OS every year, so a new jailbreak version is required to work with the new operating system. If someone has jailbroken your device, it’s nearly impossible for you to outwardly spot the difference. Unless, the person who did it was in a rush and forget to delete the jailbreaking tool (Cydia, SBSettings, Installous or Icy) from your iPhone. Now that you have developed some understanding of jailbreaking and different OS versions, let’s delve in to see what happens when a cell phone tracking app is installed on an iPhone.  

    What Happens When an iOS Spyware is Installed on Your iPhone?


    Once an iOS spy software is installed on your iPhone it will start recording all the activities that take place on the phone and upload them to the person URL account of the person who wants to keep a close eye on you. Here is what an iOS Spyware will record:

    Monitor Text Messages: All text messages including SMSs and emails will be recorded and uploaded to an online account from where the devious person can monitor your sent and received messages. He or she can see the actual content of the messages along with time and date stamps.   

    Call Log Details: Every call you have made or received on your iPhone will be intercepted by the spyware as it will gather the phone numbers, contact names together with time and date stamps and forward it to the trickster who wants to get a hold of these details.

    Internet Browsing History: This feature provides the list of websites visited using your iPhone’s web browser.

    Location Tracking: It allows the sneaky person to trace your current location in real-time. The swindler can see it on a map and usually it’s very accurate.

    Stored Data on the iPhone: All the images, videos, audios, and contacts saved on your smartphone can be easily accessed if a reliable spy system is tracking your device.

    To your surprise, the aforementioned functionalities are considered basic features with most tracking software packages. Things can get more intense when you look at some of the advanced features offered by spy app developers at extra cost. Thanks to the fierce competition in the miniature spyware industry, software providers are trying to outdo each other by offering more advanced monitoring capabilities. Check out some of the advanced functionalities offered by modern iOS tracking apps.

    Call Recording: Just as it sounds, the feature is used to record voice calls received or made by the target iOS phone. The recordings of these voice calls can be used against you if you are found guilty of a serious offense or violation.

    Surround Recording: This feature allows the double-dealer to turn on the microphone on your device and record everything you can hear.

    Track IM Chats: Popular instant messaging platforms like iMessage, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Viber, Line, etc. that you are using to connect with your friends and family members would also be under surveillance.

    Remote Controlling: A sophisticated monitoring app also lets the perpetrator remotely control your target smartphone. This is a very powerful feature as the trickster can use it to lock or wipe the data from your iPhone.

    Trigger Alerts: A cheater can easily set up specific trigger words, names, numbers, email addresses or locations which when flagged up will instantly notify him or her about a certain activity.

    To sum up, a tracking software can seriously interrupt your privacy and reveal all the secrets of your heart. So never share your phone or Apple details with anyone.  
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